How to Install Security Updates on CentOS 8

Keeping your Linux system up-to-date is a very critical task, especially when it comes to installing security updates. This ensures that your system stays safe, stable, and keeps you on top of the latest security threats.

In this short and precise article, we will explain how to install security system updates on a CentOS 8 Linux system. We will show how to check for system updates (for all installed packages), updates for a specific package, or security updates only. We will also look at how to install updates either for a specific package, for all installed packages, or security updates only.

First, log into your system and open a terminal window, or if it is a remote system, access it via ssh. And before you move any further, take note of your the current kernel version on your system:

# uname -r
Check Current Kernel Version
Check Current Kernel Version

Checking Security Updates for CentOS 8 Server

To check if there are any updates available, issue the following command on the command prompt. This command non-interactively checks whether there are any updates are available for all packages on your system.

# dnf check-update
Check CentOS 8 Updates
Check CentOS 8 Updates

If you want, you can check updates for a specific package, provide the package name as shown.

# dnf check-update cockpit
Check Updates for Package
Check Updates for Package

Checking Security Updates for Installed Software Packages

You can determine if there are security-related updates or notices available, using the following command. It will show a summary of security notices displaying the number of updates in each category. From the screenshot below, there is 1 security update available for us to install on the test system.

# dnf updateinfo
Check Notices for Security Updates
Check Notices for Security Updates

To show the actual number of security packages with updates for the system, run the command that follows. Although there is only 1 security update as indicated in the output of the previous command, the actual number of security packages is 3 because the packages are related to each other:

# dnf updateinfo list sec
OR
# dnf updateinfo list sec | awk '{print $3}'
List Number of Security Updates
List Number of Security Updates

Updating a Single Package on CentOS 8

After checking for updates, if there is any available updates, you can install it. To install updates for a single package, issue the following command (replace the cockpit with the package name):

# dnf check-update cockpit
Update a Single Package
Update a Single Package

In the same manner, you can also update a group of packages. For example, to update your development tools, run the following command.

# dnf group update “Development Tools”

Updating CentOS 8 System Packages

Now to update all of your installed packages to the latest versions, run the following command. Note that this may not be ideal in a production environment, sometimes updates may break your system – note of the next section:

# dnf update 
Install Updates for CentOS 8
Install Updates for CentOS 8

Installing Security Updates Only on CentOS 8

As mentioned above, running a system-wide update of packages may not be ideal in a production environment. So, you can only install security updates to secure your system, as shown.

# dnf update --security
Install Security Updates on CentOS 8
Install Security Updates on CentOS 8

You can also install security updates automatically using our following guide.

That’s all for now! Always know how to protect yourself from known vulnerabilities. And it all starts with keeping your Linux system up-to-date. If you have any questions or comments to share, reach us via the comment section below.

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108 thoughts on “How to Install Security Updates on CentOS 8”

  1. I am trying to download centos 6.3 from mirror web sites. However the directory is empty and it refers to the latest version 6 which is 6.4. Is version 6.3 deprecated and it is encouraged to use version 6.4 ? I am new to centos and I was a bit surprised that point releases are deprecated so fast.

    Here is a web site example:
    http://mirror.stanford.edu/yum/pub/centos/6.3/

    Reply
    • Sam, may be that mirror outdated, we already provided download links for centos 6.3 ISO in the article. Please follow those links to download.

      Reply
      • Ravi, I did check a couple of other sites and they were all the same. Thanks for the response and you folks have a helpful site.

        Reply
  2. I have xenserver 6.1 and installing centos 6.4 I can not get the gui on xencenter
    I can connect through vnc but no console on xencenter
    switch to graphical console grayed out

    Reply
  3. Hi

    I was wondering if any one can let me know why I cant download CentOS 6.3 64 dvd ISO.
    When I click the link It said ERRO and there is only a blank page.

    Thank you

    Reply
  4. Helpful but Im doing the “minimal” install. I want a feeper understanding of CentOS so I can pass Linux certifications.

    Reply
  5. When installing CentOS on a Vitual Machine, do i need to do the partitioning just the usual way like we partition on the physical machine?

    Reply
  6. Hey thanks for this tutorial. Will it apply for version 6? The part the confused me a little was the ‘wired tab’. I’m not sure if we need that. We need our set up to be used to format hard drives with Linux for Digital Cinema distribution and it will have a a CRU dock attached with a eSata connection to be used as a network drive. It’s a new machine and already has 7 32bit installed on it. Should we keep that on a parition? It will not be connected to the internet, only by the network to my DCP creation machine. We will be loading, or loading content to or from a hard drive in the CRU slot. What’s you opinion on how we should install?

    Reply

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