10 Linux System Administrators New Year’s Resolutions (2019)

It is a time to make our New Year’s resolutions. Regardless of your experience level as a Linux system administrator, we think it is worthy and well to set goals for growth for the next 12 months.

In case you are out of ideas, in this post we will share 10 simple professional resolutions that you may want to consider for 2019.

1. Decide to Automate More

You don’t need to run like a chicken with its head cut off trying to solve foreseeable problems every day. If you find yourself spending time performing repetitive tasks on a daily basis, you need to stop here and now.

With all the Linux-based and open source tools at your disposal, you can give yourself some leisure time by automating as many of your Linux tasks as possible.

You will find that several of the following resolutions will help you work towards this goal, so keep reading.

Additionally, do yourself a favor and take a couple of minutes to browse through our Free eBooks section.

Chances are you will want to download the books related to Bash shell scripting and brush up your skills. Happy automating!

2. Learn a New Scripting Language

Although every system administrator should be comfortable using Bash for scripting, it is important to consider other modern and robust tools such as Python.

But don’t just take our word for it – check this 2-article series on Python that we published not long ago. You will realize that, among other things, Python brings the power of Object-oriented programming and allows you to write shorter and more robust scripts.

3. Learn a New Programming Language

In addition to learning a new scripting language, decide to take some time to start or brush up your programming skills. Not sure where to start? This year’s Stackoverflow Developer Survey reveals that Javascript continues to lead the list of most popular languages for third year in a row.

Other all-time favorites such as Java and C are also worthy of your consideration. Do check out our Best Programming Courses of 2018.

4. Create a GitHub Account and Update it Regularly

Especially if you are new to programming, you should consider showcasing your work on GitHub. By allowing others to fork your scripts or programs, you will be able to improve your knowledge and create more sophisticated software through the help of others.

Learn more on how to install and create GitHub Account.

5. Contribute to an Open Source Project

Another great way to learn (or improve your knowledge about) a new scripting or programming language is by contributing to an open source project on GitHub.

If this sounds like something that may interest you, check the Explore GitHub pages. There you can browse repositories by popularity or by language, so you will be able to find something interesting to work on.

On top of this, you’ll get the satisfaction that comes from giving back to the community.

6. Try Out a New Distribution Each Month

With new distributions or spin-offs coming out regularly, you have several options to choose from. Who knows that your dream distribution is just around the corner and you have not discovered it yet? Head to Distrowatch and pick a new distribution each month.

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to Tecmint to stay informed about new distros hitting the streets, so to speak.

Hopefully our reviews will help you to determine if you want to give a new distribution a try. Also do check out our articles on top Linux distributions here:

  1. Top Linux Distributions To look Forward To In 2019
  2. 10 Linux Distributions and Their Targeted Users

7. Attend a Linux or Open Source Conference

If you live near a place where a conference sponsored by the Linux Foundation is scheduled to take place, I strongly encourage you to attend.

This will not only provide the opportunity to enhance your knowledge about Linux but also give you the chance to meet other open source professionals.

8. Learn Free or Paid Course from Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation continually offers free and paid courses through edX.org and via their own portal, respectively.

Topics for free courses include (but may not be limited to) Introduction to Linux, Introduction to Cloud Infrastructure Technologies, and Introduction to OpenStack.

On the other hand, paid options include preparation for the LFCS Certification and LFCE certification exams, Linux for developers, Kernel internals, Linux Security, Performance testing, High Availability, and more.

As a plus, they offer discounts for enterprise courses, so try to convince your boss to pay for your and your colleagues’ training. Additionally, free webinars are offered on a periodic basis so don’t forget to subscribe to< their newsletters!

You may also consider checking out our best Online Linux Training Courses.

9. Answer X Questions in a Linux Forum Per Week

Another great way to give back to the community is by helping others who are just starting off with their Linux journey. You will find lots of people looking for answers in Linux forums all over the web.

Keep in mind that you were once a newbie just like them, and try to put yourself in their shoes.

10. Teach a Kid or Teenager to Use Linux

If I could go back 20 years, I wish I had a computer back then and the chance to learn Linux as a teenager.

I also wish I had to start off with programming much earlier than I did. Without a doubt, things would have been a whole lot easier. That kind of gives me the perspective that teaching at least basic Linux and programming skills to kids or teenagers (I do it with my own kids) is an important endeavor.

Educating the raising generation on how to effectively use open source technologies will give them the freedom of choice, and they will thank you forever for it.

Summary

In this article we have shared 10 prospective New Year’s resolutions for system administrators. The Tecmint.com wishes you the best of luck as you work towards your goals and hope to keep you as a frequent reader in 2019.

As always, don’t hesitate to use the form below if you have questions or comments about this article. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Gabriel Cánepa

Gabriel Cánepa is a GNU/Linux sysadmin and web developer from Villa Mercedes, San Luis, Argentina. He works for a worldwide leading consumer product company and takes great pleasure in using FOSS tools to increase productivity in all areas of his daily work.

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3 Responses

  1. Edward Arcuri says:

    Very good list. I especially like #10 – teaching someone Linux. I am currently helping my son navigate the Linux cmd line with an Ubuntu 16.04 VM on his laptop.

    He is also learning python from me (and Youtube of course) as he continues learning Linux. He is starting off to college in the fall of 2017 and I want to make sure he is prepared with the basics so that whatever he decides to major in, it will be easier for him.

    Next up is git, LXC and Docker. We will see what he needs after that.

    • Gabriel A. Cánepa says:

      Edward,
      Thank you for your comment, and kudos to you for teaching those skills to your son. Best of luck to you both!

  2. Ulrich Gros says:

    Good morning,

    I have same trouble with my Websites on Ubuntu Same of them I can open and work with them, but most of them will be appear Site fault or Side loading errors, I’m change the Browser from Firefox to Chrome but it will be all the same. What can I due to look on the Sites I needs,

    can same body help me

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