How to Rescue, Repair and Reinstall GRUB Boot Loader in Ubuntu

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Matei Cezar

I'am a computer addicted guy, a fan of open source and linux based system software, have about 4 years experience with Linux distributions desktop, servers and bash scripting.

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5 Responses

  1. Skip Flem says:

    I have a quick grub2.02 display, however it’s ignored. and the computer boots straight to ‘line 1‘; despite a boot cd in the drive and a usb stick in a usb3 port. It’s as if the keyboard is never recognized until I get my Ubuntu screen.

  2. ilyas says:

    Does this affect files and data on my ubuntu or nothing at all and I will be able to retrive them all?

  3. Doug Nintzel says:

    Hello, thanks for the article. You mentioned in the intro “However, this tutorial will only cover Ubuntu server GRUB rescue procedure, although the same procedure can be successfully applied on any Ubuntu system or on the majority of Debian-based distributions.” …

    I don’t see these screens or menu options in non-server installs….how do you get to expert mode and modify the parameters etc.?

  4. Mohammad says:

    In below part of your post you said “before the quiet string” but the correct is “after the quiet string“. please check it out.

    4. Next, edit Ubuntu live image boot options by using the keyboard arrows to move the cursor just before the quiet string and write the following sequence as illustrated in the below screenshot.

  5. Julian says:

    I think this information is not valid for modern SSD machines. In my system /dev/sda (/dev/sda1) is an external hard disk. The internal hard disk from which the OS boots is /dev/nvme0n1.

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