Upgrade Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) to Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr)

Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) was released on 17 October 2013 and its support will be going to end after July 2014. Now, its time to upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr) LTS.

Update: Ubuntu 15.10 Released – Upgrade to Ubuntu 15.10

This version will be supported for the next 5 Years and this really a good news for business customers. Also this will provide good performance as well as robustness.

Upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04
Upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04

If you are an Ubuntu lover and want to give a try to Ubuntu 14.04, you can grab ISO images and install it via USB. If you are using Ubuntu 13.10 and want to upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 release, you can follow below simple instructions.

Warning: We urged you to take important data backup prior upgradation and also read release notes for more information before upgrading to latest version.

Upgrade Ubuntu 13.10 to 14.04

Step 1: Please run below command from terminal which will install all other available upgrades.

$ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
Ubuntu Upgrade
Ubuntu Upgrade

Step 2: After your system got updated. Press “Alt+F2“ and type ”update-manager -d”. Here, “-d” is for checking development release. This will launch the software updater.

Ubuntu Update Manager
Ubuntu Update Manager

Step 3: Software updater will start looking for any changes or for new Releases.

Ubuntu Software Updater
Ubuntu Software Updater

Step 4: On “Software Updater” dialog box, click on “Upgrade…“.

Upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04
Upgrade

Step 5: It will show Release Notes. Please have a look on release note and click on “Upgrade“.

Ubuntu Release Notes
Ubuntu Release Notes

Step 6: Click “Start Upgrade” to begin upgradation.

Start Upgrade
Start Upgrade
Upgrade Process
Upgrade Process

Step 7: The Process of Upgrading Ubuntu to version 14.04; this may take longer time depending on internet bandwidth and system configuration.

Ubuntu Upgrading
Ubuntu Upgrading
Applying Changes
Applying Changes
Configuring Services
Configuring Services

Step 8: Once System upgrade gets completed. Click on “Restart Now“.

Upgrade Completed
Upgrade Completed

Step 9: Check the System details post upgrade.

Ubuntu 14.04 Login Screen
Ubuntu 14.04 Login Screen
Ubuntu 14.04 Details
Ubuntu 14.04 Details

That’s it! you’ve successfully upgraded to Ubuntu 14.04 from Ubuntu 13.10. The above upgrade instructions was written for Ubuntu, but you can also use these instructions to upgrade any Ubuntu based distributions such as Xubuntu, Kubuntu or Lubuntu 14.04.

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43 thoughts on “Upgrade Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) to Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr)”

  1. Hi,
    I have issue to update my Ubuntu:

    Could not calculate the upgrade and bla bla bla

    I have screenshot of the error, where can I show it?

    Do you know why?

    Thanks,
    Giuseppe

    Reply
    • Hi,
      I get this error when I try to upgrade:

      W:Failed to fetch bzip2:/var/lib/apt/lists/partial/it.archive.ubuntu.com_ubuntu_dists_trusty-updates_universe_source_Sources Hash Sum mismatch
      , E:Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead

      Reply
  2. Hi, after the upgrade the system doesn’t run, a message say “critical errors on hdd, tmp not detected” i will appreciate any help. thanks in advance

    Reply
  3. Followed exactly these instructions in my laptop with Windows8 and Ubuntu 13.10 (with UEFI)… result> corrupted my MBR and had to re-install everything from scratch… THANKS for ruining my week!!

    As an advice from other users who may be tempted to do this upgrade… You’d better get a live linuxin a usb stick and upgrade using it. This way the linux installer in the live version allows you to install the new ubuntu version without having to remove the old one. I wonder if I had followed that simple ruled I would have save myself from tons of headaches.

    Reply
  4. Had to set Lubuntu to check for all new versions (not LTS only) for it to discover 14.04 as an upgrade.

    Will be interesting to see how this will work. Have usually done a fresh install.

    Reply
    • There may be issue with your internet connection. Make sure you have internet connection with good speed. Please try again and then check again. Hope it’ll work :).

      Reply
    • Same issue here. SEVERAL errors in GETing files and/or comparing checksums. I’ve removed all 3rd party sources and still get the errors. Still trying to identify the cause(s) and/or locate others who have overcome this. It sure looks to be a simple process; however, it is not proving so in practice.

      Reply
    • This is the specific point of error — in all cases this error is encountered.

      W:Failed to fetch gzip:/var/lib/apt/lists/partial/ubuntu.cs.utah.edu_ubuntu_dists_trusty_universe_binary-i386_Packages
      Hash Sum mismatch, E:Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead.

      Reply
      • There seems some issues with your source list. Please take backup of your current source list.

        Go to http://repogen.simplylinux.ch/, choose your country, release, branch and required updates and then create a new source list.

        After this open command line and fire “sudo do-release-upgrade”

        Hope this will help!!

        Reply
  5. I’m running 13.10 with XFCE on Samsung ARM Chromebook…Crouton. Basically a newbie to the Linux world. Does 14.04 work on the Samsung Chromebook? Will the above instructions work? Or should I start over, downloading image, put in developer mode, etc.?

    Reply
    • Hi Fergie,

      Honestly, Not sure about the upgrade process on Samsung ARM Chromebook. I’ll definitely share if found something on this :).

      Thanks!

      Reply
  6. I “upgraded” (L)ubuntu from 13.10 to 14.04 using the update-manager.
    When I reboot, I am asked for a password, but once the display manager starts, nothing else works: no menu, no panel, no response to alt-F2.
    I think I got some gtk issues– when I ran the update-manager from a consol session (cntrol-alt-F1) I see some errors related to gtk (assertion failed, etc.).
    Any idea how to fix it? Should I reformat and start from scratch?

    Reply
      • I want to ask you wether the upgrading from Ubuntu 13.10 to 14.04 via the Update Manager will remove my data on the local drive?

        Reply
        • Upgrade will modify your system config file only which usually reside in /(root) partition if you are not using different partition for boot,home or other custom partition.

          Note : Tecmint is not responsible for any data loss. Follow the things at own your own Risk.

          Reply
  7. Thanks! That worked like a charm, didn’t even need to stop working. Installation looks good, no errors at startup

    Reply
    • Hi John,

      Along with LTS of 5 years,others changes are as below :

      1.) Number of Packages have been Updated.
      2.) Ubuntu 14.04 includes the 3.13.0-19.39 Ubuntu Linux kernel which was based on the v3.13.6 upstream Linux kernel.
      3.) Python 3.4
      4.) 14.04 will characterized by “performance, refinement, maintainability, technical debt”.
      5.) Development focused on tablet interface mainly for Nexus 7 and Nexus 10.

      Thanks!
      Kuldeep

      Reply
    • Nothing difference. I read this interesting news somewhere on the web. Ubuntu team follows an interesting naming methodology.

      The version number of a particular Ubuntu release represents the release year and month. For example, let us take the latest Ubuntu 14.04 version. This version is released in the year 2014, so they take the number “14”. And it is released on April month(4th month of the 2014), so they pick 04. So latest version is Ubuntu 14.04. Clear?

      Also, the Ubuntu developers name the distributions in an alphabetical order. The code name is the combination of an adjective and an animal name with the same first letter. For example, Ubuntu 14.04 code name is Trusty Tahr. Here, Trusty is an adjective, Tahr is an animal (Goat), and both words contain the same first letter i.e “T”.

      Ubuntu developers releases new versions at every six month, and every fourth release becomes a long-term-support (LTS) version.

      For more, details look at the below link:

      https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases

      Hope you understand now.

      Reply
    • Not all .04 releases are LTS. Only once in every two years, Ubuntu releases an LTS. The previous one was 12.04 (released in April, ’12), the current one is 14.04 (released on April, ’14) and the next one will be 16.04 (should release on April, ’16).

      Reply

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