XenServer Network (LACP Bond, VLAN and Bonding) Configuration – Part 3

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Rob Turner

Rob Turner is an avid Debian user as well as many of the derivatives of Debian such as Devuan, Mint, Ubuntu, and Kali. Rob holds a Masters in Information and Communication Sciences as well as several industry certifications from Cisco, EC-Council, ISC2, Linux Foundation, and LPI.

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4 Responses

  1. Eric Pretorious says:

    Thanks, Rob:

    Can you recommend some way of identifying the UUID of the XenServer host’s Primary Management Interface (PMI) from the command-line?

    TIA,
    Eric Pretorious
    Portland, Oregon

    • Rob Turner says:

      Eric,

      Sure! xe pif-list management=true host-name-label= or if you want only the UUID only you can run the following command: xe pif-list management=true host-name-label= | head -1 | awk -F ‘: ‘ ‘{print $2}’

      xe pif-list management=true host-name-label=

      Output:

      uuid ( RO) : 2ba82249-cc18-8525-3a3a-289890665e08
      Device ( RO): eth0
      currently-attached ( RO): true
      VLAN ( RO): -1
      network-uuid ( RO): 5798e0f4-d84a-ae3e-c090-709f70a016ac

      xe pif-list management=true host-name-label= | head -1 | awk -F ‘: ‘ ‘{print $2}’

      Output:

      2ba82249-cc18-8525-3a3a-289890665e08

      Thanks!

  2. Abhinav says:

    Nicely documented !!

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