Installation Guide of Linux Mint 19.2 Codename ‘Tina’ with Screenshots

Linux Mint is a modern, polished, easy-to-use and comfortable community-driven GNU/Linux desktop distribution based on the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution. It is a great and recommended distribution for computer users switching from Windows or Mac OS X operating system to the Linux platform.

The stable release of Linux Mint 19.2 code-named “Tina” was officially announced by the Linux Mint development team and it is based on Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS (Bionic Beaver).

Read Also: How to Install Linux Mint 19 Alongside Windows 10 or 8 in Dual-Boot UEFI Mode

Importantly, Linux Mint 19.2 is a long term support (LTS) release to be supported until April 2023 and comes along with several updated software, improvements and some new features and these include:

  1. Improved kernel 4.15 support in the Update Manager.
  2. Ubuntu 18.04 package base
  3. Cinnamon 4.2 and MATE 1.22 desktops
  4. MDM 2.0
  5. X-apps
  6. Update manager
  7. Mint-Y plus many more

This tutorial will guide you on how you can install the latest version of Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon edition on your dedicated machine or a virtual machine. The same instructions also apply for both Mate and Xfce desktop installations.

Download Linux Mint 19 ISO Images

First of all, you need to download the ISO image from the links below:

  1. Download Linux Mint 19.2 – Cinnamon (32-bit)
  2. Download Linux Mint 19.2 – Cinnamon (64-bit)
  3. Download Linux Mint 19.2 – MATE (32-bit)
  4. Download Linux Mint 19.2 – MATE (64-bit)
  5. Download Linux Mint 19.2 – Xfce (32-bit)
  6. Download Linux Mint 19.2 – Xfce (64-bit)

Once you downloaded preferred desktop edition, make sure to create a bootable media-USB flash/DVD using Rufus utility in order to create an Linux Mint bootable USB drive.

Installation of Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon Desktop

1. After creating a bootable media, insert into a working USB port or DVD drive and boot into it, then, after a few seconds, you should be able to see the screen below and finally a live Linux Mint 18 desktop.

Booting Linux Mint

Booting Linux Mint

Double click on the “Install Linux Mint” installer icon to start the installer.

Click on Install Linux Mint

Click on Install Linux Mint

2. You should be at the welcome screen below, select the installation language and click on the “Continue” button.

Select Linux Mint Installation Language

Select Linux Mint Installation Language

3. Next, select your Keyboard Layout and continue.

Select Linux Mint Keyboard Layout

Select Linux Mint Keyboard Layout

4. Then prepare to start the actual installation process, you can check the check-box in the screen below to install third-party software for graphics, Wi-Fi hardware, Flash, MP3 plus many other media. After that, click on the “Continue” to proceed.

Install Third-Party Software in Linux Mint

Install Third-Party Software in Linux Mint

5. Then, select the Installation type as follows, to perform manual partitioning, select “Something else” and click on “Continue” to proceed.

Select Linux Mint Installation Type

Select Linux Mint Installation Type

6. You will have to do a manual installation disk setup. To perform a manual partitioning scheme, click on “New Partition Table”.

Select New Partition Table

Select New Partition Table

7. Next, click “Continue” on the dialog box in the screen below to set up a new empty partition table on the hard disk you have selected.

Create New Partition Table on Device

Create a New Partition Table on Device

8. Then select the “free space” that has been made available on the hard disk to create new partitions on the hard disk.

Select Free Space to Create Partitions

Select Free Space to Create Partitions

9. From the screen above, you will see I have 42.9GB disk space, in this I will create two partitions i.e. / and swap. First, create a / partition by clicking on the “+” button to create the root partition for your Linux Mint. You will see the screen below and enter the following parameters and click “OK”.

Size: 40GB             
Type partition: Primary 
Location for the new partition: Beginning of this space
Set partition filesystem type: Ext4 journaling file system 
Set the mount point from here: /
Create Root Partition

Create Root Partition

10. Next, create a swap the partition which is space on your hard disk that temporarily holds data not actively being worked on by the system from RAM.

To create the swap space, click on the “+” sign, enter the parameters as in the screen below and click “OK”.

Create Swap Partition

Create Swap Partition

Linux Mint Partition Table

Linux Mint Partition Table

11. After creating all the partitions, click on the “Install Now” and click on “Continue” on the dialog box below asking you to confirm the partitioning scheme you have set.

Confirm Write Changes to Partitions

Confirm Write Changes to Partitions

12. Select your country location from the screen below and click “Continue”.

Select Country Location

Select Country Location

13. Now it is time to set up a system user account. Enter your full name, computer name, a system username, and a good password. After that, click on “Continue”.

Create Linux Mint User Account

Create Linux Mint User Account

14. The actual system files will now be installed on your root partition as in the screen below.

Linux Mint Installation Process

Linux Mint Installation Process

Linux Mint Installation Continues

Linux Mint Installation Continues

15. Wait until the installation process is complete, you will see the dialog box below, remove the installation USB/DVD and then, click “Restart Now” to reboot your machine.

Linux Mint Installation Complete

Linux Mint Installation Complete

16. After rebooting, you will see the screen below, click on the username on the screen and enter your password to login to Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon desktop.

Linux Mint Login

Linux Mint Login

Linux Mint Desktop

Linux Mint Desktop

Hoping that everything went on well, you can now enjoy Linux Mint 19.2 on your machine. For any questions or additional information, you can use the comment section below.

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30 Responses

  1. Charlie N says:

    Hi, Currently running Mint 17 Qiana for the past year, on an 80 GB root internal drive, and two other drives, a 160 GB and a 1TB drive, both using USB the 80GB drive is telling me it is full, yet the directories say it is only “half” full machine is sluggish and acting strangely…(I can’t save files to desktop…)

    So, I purchased a 2 TB drive, and wish to install Mint 18.3 Sarah, on that, keeping the two USB data drives. Are there any pitfalls I should watch for? I would also like to name the partitions rather than
    have a 17 digit Alpha- Numeric naming protocol on my 1TB drive, and a 9 digit Alpha- Numeric for the 160GB as it is currently (by default).

    This will be my 2nd Linux installation. Thank You.

  2. morteza says:

    Hi, i installed Linux Mint with following partition /(120GB), swap(4gb) and /home (remained capacity approximately 376 Gb). my HDD is 500GB. every thing is going well. but I have a drive on my computer beside filesystem (which is my root) when I want to open I face to this error “unable to mount location, can’t mount file”.

    I don’t know about this drive is that /root drive? why I can’t mount it.I want another drive to save my files and other stuff except /root and /home partition.

    • Aaron Kili says:

      @morteza

      You need to mount the drive partition manually and add a mount entry in /etc/inittab so it is auto mounted at boot time. For more info, check out the mount utility man page.

  3. vkmp1432 says:

    I am getting error input/output error 5 while copying of mint 18.2

  4. Sadick says:

    How should i partition my hard disk into drive c and drive d like that of windows.

    • Aaron Kili says:

      Just follow the steps used in the guide, it is done the same way the partitions here have been created. C=/ (root)partition in Linux and likewise create another partition as D.

  5. mgroup says:

    What happens if you skip adding the partitions during installation? I have to ask since I am new to linux.

  6. onadd says:

    Why not create the 3rd partition for /home? It will save you the headache for future reinstalls.

  7. Aravind Kumar says:

    Hello Aaron,
    Great article, really it helped me in installing mint 18 on my Pc.great going follow up with same pace.

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