8 Useful Commands to Monitor Swap Space Usage in Linux

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Aaron Kili

Aaron Kili is a Linux and F.O.S.S enthusiast, an upcoming Linux SysAdmin, web developer, and currently a content creator for TecMint who loves working with computers and strongly believes in sharing knowledge.

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9 Responses

  1. Balamukunda Sahu says:

    Nice artical and nicely explained but i have one query that why to use swap space even if we have lot of free memory?

    • Aaron Kili says:

      @Balamukunda

      Swap space is used to temporarily hold data moved from the system RAM, which is not actively being used by the system or user especially when RAM is filling up. It is therefore a “backup RAM” of sorts. Even if you have enough RAM, it is still recommended to create a swap space for Linux.

      Another reason is that it helps during hibernation of a computer, where the an image of the RAM captured and saved in the swap area. On restarting the computer, that image is reloaded into RAM, thereby enabling you to work from where you had stopped(point of hibernation).

      I hope you find this helpful.

  2. Tomas says:

    Good stuff, but you forgot to mention likely the best tool to monitor swap usage on Linux: smem.

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