10 Useful Open Source Security Firewalls for Linux Systems

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Tarunika Shrivastava

I am a linux server admin and love to play with Linux and all other distributions of it. I am working as System Engineer with a Web Hosting Company.

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32 Responses

  1. Jose says:

    Which of them can select, filter, access, deny traffic for processor program name as in windows I so confusing for IP address. Please help if you can, I was using zone alarm or Tini wall in windows is so easy. Why there is not some similar in Linux?

    I speak Spanish sorry for my English.

    Thanks

  2. Scott Noakes says:

    Hi,

    Great article, thanks for posting. It might also be worth checking out Linewize, we’ve built an open source cloud managed layer 7 firewall which is free to use.

    We provide complete visibility over internet use on a per user, device and application basis through our subscription services, all the firewall and filtering goodness is free for anyone to use.

    If you’re keen to have a look the install instructions are here linewize.com/install. Keen to know what you think.

    Cheers Scott.

  3. yurikoles says:

    There is only one firewall for Linux: iptables, other one in your list is either a frontends for it or some specific Linux-distros or even FreeBSD-based distro. One of the list is WUI for iptables which is distributed in a tarball with sources of files, because all of them are scripts. And a proprietary license. It’s hard to imagine how could one “decompile or disassemble, or reverse engineer” a text file!

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