Setup RAID Level 6 (Striping with Double Distributed Parity) in Linux – Part 5

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14 Responses

  1. enriluis says:

    Hi all great articles, before sorry about my English…

    I had a Lacie 5Big network 2 with 5 2tb hdd of it disk 2 and 3 are missing from raid 6, so the Lacie never boot again.. I cloned the 3 rest disks mount it on Ubuntu virtual machine, I need to emulate the raid 6 to recover my information please..

    # fdisk -l
    Disk /dev/sdb: 1.8 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors
    Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disklabel type: gpt
    Disk identifier: B5AF2D81-5FCC-11D3-B07D-BEC07E6256B8
    Device       Start        End    Sectors  Size Type
    /dev/sdb1  4038656    4040703       2048    1M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb2  4046848 3907027119 3902980272  1.8T Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb3  4040704    4042751       2048    1M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb4  4042752    4046847       4096    2M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb5     2048     520191     518144  253M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb6   520192     536575      16384    8M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb7   536576     569343      32768   16M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb8   569344    2256895    1687552  824M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb9  2256896    4022271    1765376  862M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdb10 4022272    4038655      16384    8M Microsoft basic data
    Partition table entries are not in disk order.
    Disk /dev/sdc: 1.8 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors
    Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disklabel type: gpt
    Disk identifier: 1627E101-6E8E-11D3-9378-EB1415753F50
    Device       Start        End    Sectors  Size Type
    /dev/sdc1  4038656    4040703       2048    1M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc2  4046848 3907027119 3902980272  1.8T Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc3  4040704    4042751       2048    1M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc4  4042752    4046847       4096    2M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc5     2048     520191     518144  253M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc6   520192     536575      16384    8M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc7   536576     569343      32768   16M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc8   569344    2256895    1687552  824M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc9  2256896    4022271    1765376  862M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sdc10 4022272    4038655      16384    8M Microsoft basic data
    Partition table entries are not in disk order.
    Disk /dev/sda: 1.8 TiB, 2000398934016 bytes, 3907029168 sectors
    Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disklabel type: gpt
    Disk identifier: 5FA4F781-62F6-11D3-9AF5-96D50CBB9EB8
    Device       Start        End    Sectors  Size Type
    /dev/sda1  4038656    4040703       2048    1M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda2  4046848 3907027119 3902980272  1.8T Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda3  4040704    4042751       2048    1M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda4  4042752    4046847       4096    2M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda5     2048     520191     518144  253M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda6   520192     536575      16384    8M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda7   536576     569343      32768   16M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda8   569344    2256895    1687552  824M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda9  2256896    4022271    1765376  862M Microsoft basic data
    /dev/sda10 4022272    4038655      16384    8M Microsoft basic data
    Partition table entries are not in disk order.
    mdadm --examine /dev/sda /dev/sdc /dev/sdd
    /dev/sda:
    MBR Magic : aa55
    Partition[0] :   4294967295 sectors at            1 (type ee)
    /dev/sdc:
    MBR Magic : aa55
    Partition[0] :   4294967295 sectors at            1 (type ee)
    /dev/sdd:
    MBR Magic : aa55
    Partition[0] :     29358080 sectors at         2048 (type 83)
    Partition[1] :      4190210 sectors at     29362174 (type 05)
    

    I had installed mdadm software but i don’t know where start

  2. Nige says:

    There is a small typo in this article. “and mount it under /mnt/raid5” should be “and mount it under /mnt/raid6”.

    Irrespective – very informative! Thanks.

  3. Akhil says:

    I have 8 old hdds varying from 80gb to 250gb in size.i want to create a redundant disk array using these disks and want to share it in lan so that others can store there file and thus make use of old hdds.have Dell precision t 3500 with win 7 have built in raid controller.can u help me to start this

  4. geogeotx says:

    Thank you for the very well documented article.

    1) My raid would disappear after each reboot. md0 would be gone. My theory is because of this command “mdadm –detail –scan –verbose >> /etc/mdadm.conf”

    When I changed location to /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf then I think the raid survived reboot (this is an unconfirmed theory)

    2) Here are suggested commands to use “parted’ for drives greater than 2TB.

    sudo parted -a optimal /dev/sda
    (parted) mklabel gpt
    (parted) mkpart primary 1 -1 (or ==> mkpart primary 1MiB 512MiB ???)
    (parted) align-check
    alignment type(min/opt) [optimal]/minimal? optimal
    Partition number? 1
    (parted) set 1 raid on
    (parted) quit

    Thanks again for an excellent article

  5. Mike says:

    Hi ravi,

    I am using raid5(3disk – 600GB each) in LVM FS, so i get 1.8T LVM partition. Now I have to add new disk – 1TB in LVM. Do we have to add it in Raid or can we attach it directly and convert it into pv then extend vg..

    what could be the possible ways ?

    • Ravi Saive says:

      @Mike,
      You should follow below procedure for extending your space..

      1. Add a new drive
      2. Use mdadm –grow to add it to the RAID5
      3. pvresize to increase the size of the PV
      4. lvextend to increase the size of the LV
      5. resize2fs to grow the filesystem

  6. Mrutyunjaya says:

    But how can i Up again that /dev/sdd1 partition ???

  7. Debasish says:

    What about Raid 5 that Ravi sir has promised to be published in Friday but haven’t. Is waiting for this.

  8. Omipenuin says:

    I think this Tut should be Part 4…….

    • Ravi Saive says:

      No, actually RAID 5 setup is the part 4 article, but we by mistakenly posted part 5. Part 4 will be published on Friday..

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