4 Useful Commandline Tools to Monitor MySQL Performance in Linux

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Ravi Saive

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3 Responses

  1. Sol says:

    Innotop could be a great tool but is dangerously insecure. It requires that the password either be entered on the command line (and retrievable via .bash_history) or stored in plain text in a config file. The dev of the tool feels prompting for the password in the same manner that mysql’s CLI does would be “hard/impossible/impractical” (his words). Push requests with a fix have been made by a few people but have been ignored. If he’s skimping on the most basic of security features, I cringe to think of what else has been avoided because “it’s hard”.

    This is not a tool that should be used in a production environment.

    • younicks says:

      Could you not use gpg to secure the password? I’m not familiar with the tool so don’t know if it’s possible.

  2. mloshka says:

    You are talking about very specific tools, but have you tried usual things like Pingdom or Anturis, or Cacti or anything like that. I think it is much better to set up such a tool and than monitor the whole system with one tool.

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