21 Best Music Players That Are Worth Trying On Linux

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Gunjit Khera

Currently a Computer Science student and a geek when it comes to Operating System and its concepts. Have 1+ years of experience in Linux and currently doing a research on its internals along with developing applications for Linux on python and C.

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24 Responses

  1. Serge Aleksson says:

    best gtk player is deadbeef, best console player is moc

  2. jeb bush says:

    Pragha, Noise

  3. Tim says:

    One of the things that make Quod Libet really stand out is that it does not restrict you to using the official tag keys, something I’ve always been really annoyed with in almost every other player.

    You can make up whatever tags you like with QL, and since it’s interface is built dynamically (programmed by you in a simple markup language which can show info conditionally), it can look like this: http://imgur.com/5FrtwG0

  4. Lucas says:

    Thanks for introducing to Tomahawk! This music player rocks! Fast start-up, modern and easy UI, many options. My favorite.

  5. Serge says:

    Also Musique and Gnome music player very cool program

    • Gunjit Khera says:

      Thanks for updating about them and being a regular follower of tecmint.
      Stay Connected :-)

    • Juan Carlos Alpízar says:

      I love Gnome Music UI, but I don’t like how restrictive it is with options and that took me to this article: doesn’t allow many (or any) customization options, you’re limited to the Music folder, you can’t open files from Nautilus directly and you can’t even set it up as the default app for audio.

      Hopefully I’ll find a replacement among this list, which is by far the most complete I’ve seen in a while, thanks tecmint for the great article :)

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