Exploring /proc File System in Linux

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Rob Krul

Rob is an avid user of Linux and Open Source Software, with over 15 years experience in the tech geek universe. Aside from experimenting with the many flavors of Linux, he enjoys working with BSDs, Solaris, and OS X. He currently works as an Independent IT Contractor.

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4 Responses

  1. Paul R says:

    Minor issue – it’s /proc/consoles (with an s at the end)

    Also you might want to add mention of /proc/self and why this happens:

    pbr@reiberlabs:~$ cd /proc/self
    pbr@reiberlabs:/proc/self$ readlink -e .
    pbr@reiberlabs:/proc/self$ readlink -e /proc/self

  2. Ricky Tan says:

    Thanks for the info sir.. very much appreciated

  3. Rob Krul says:

    Depending on what type of hardware you have, you can get a lot of information in some of the /proc files. Since you were asking specifically about your video card, you can run:

    $ cat /proc/pci

    If it is using an ISA slot, you can run the following:

    $ cat /proc/isapnp

    If you are looking for your hard drive info:

    cat /proc/scsi/scsi

    The man page of /proc/ will give you plenty of info about any file in the /proc directory.

    Of course, there are easier ways to obtain this information, and utilities that are much more script-friendly. lshw is the first:

    $ lshw -class disk

    There is also hwinfo:

    $ hwinfo –disk

    And the very script-friendly lsblk:

    $ lsblk -io KNAME,TYPE,SIZE,MODEL

    All three of those utilities are available through apt or yum.

  4. Ricky Tan says:


    Just a question, what file in /proc will I know the brand of my hard disk? memory video card? is it all located in /proc?


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